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Latest Family Practice Medical News

Latest medical news and articles regarding Family Medicine

The information provided is designed to support, not replace, the relationship that exists between a patient/site visitor and his/her physician. The articles are loaded from trusted internet medical news sites but are not verified or approved by our physicians. The purpose of the page is NOT for medical advice, is rather informative and does not reflect our doctors professional opinion!




What causes a chronic cough?
A chronic cough is one that lasts for 8 weeks in adults or 4 weeks in children. It may produce mucus or be dry and tickle the throat. Common causes of a persistent cough include asthma and bronchitis. Less commonly, it can indicate lung cancer or heart problems. Learn more about causes, symptoms, and treatments here.

What causes mucus in the chest?
Mucus in the chest can cause discomfort and symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, sleep difficulties, and a sore throat. We describe simple, natural home remedies that can help to relieve mucus and inflammation in the chest. Here, learn when to see a doctor and how to use steam and homemade vapor rubs effectively.


Heart failure: Destroying gut bacteria could improve outcomes
In a new study, researchers demonstrate that immune molecules activated by gut bacteria could negatively impact cardiac health following heart failure.

How long can a person live with congestive heart failure?
Congestive heart failure is a progressive disease that causes the heart to weaken, making it difficult to pump blood around the body. In this article, we look at the symptoms, stages, and life expectancy of congestive heart failure. We also look at treatment options, including lifestyle changes and surgery.


Artificial sweeteners may damage blood vessels
In the most detailed study of its type, researchers demonstrate that artificial sweeteners damage blood vessels and may increase diabetes risk.

Diabetes: Body fat percentage, not BMI, predicts risk
A new study suggests that the standard body mass index cannot accurately predict someone's risk of developing type 2 diabetes or prediabetes.